In Memoriam

Christopher Barry (1947-2012)

In Memoriam


Christopher Barry

Christopher Barry passed away peacefully at the age of 65 on December 13th, 2012. He was born on November 5th, 1947 in Blakely, Georgia. He received a B.S. in Industrial Management at Georgia Tech in 1970 and then did graduate work at the University of Indiana, earning an MBA in 1972 and a Doctor of Business Administration in 1973. His dissertation under Robert Winkler at Indiana represented a pioneering application of the Bayesian approach to portfolio theory and was published in the Journal of Finance in 1974. His first appointment was at the University of Florida in 1974 and after successive appointments at the University of Texas and at Southern Methodist University where he was Chairman of the Finance Department from 1982 to 1986, Chris joined Texas Christian University in 1988 where he was Professor of Finance and Maria Lowdon Chair in Business Administration at the M. J. Neeley School of Business. Chris served the American Finance Association as Book Review Editor for the Journal of Finance from 1995 to 1999. His early interest in the Bayesian approach to portfolio theory led to a number of important publications. In mid career he became very interested in Spanish language and culture and his research interests shifted to emerging markets, and he has extensively published in this area. He has had an amazing impact on the lives of those around him and has won many teaching awards through his career and in 2006 was awarded the MBA Alumni Professor of the Year Award at TCU. Since 1986 he was a sought after expert witness in securities and business litigation, being identified as a “Selected Expert” by Cornerstone Research. Chris is survived by his wife of 44 years, Gayle, his two children and five grandchildren, and will be missed by his family, friends, colleagues and students. His family have asked that contributions be made to an endowed scholarship fund that has been established in his name at TCU.

Myron J. Gordon (1920-2010)

In Memoriam


Myron J. Gordon

Myron Jules Gordon, known as Mike to his family and colleagues, died on July 5, 2010 at the age of 89 in Summit, New Jersey. A major leader in the development of modern-day finance, his name is instantly recognized by students and practitioners in finance through the Gordon Growth Model. His model, however, was only a small part of his very important contributions in accounting, economics and finance and their applications in social issues.

Mike grew up in Brooklyn, New York. He received a B.A. in economics at the University of Wisconsin (1941), where he developed a passion for that discipline. After serving in the U.S. Army as a 2nd lieutenant during WW II, he returned to study economics at Harvard University where he received an M.A. in economics (1947) and a Ph.D. in economics (1952). He was an Assistant Professor at Carnegie-Mellon University (1947-52), Associate Professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1952-62), Professor at the University of Rochester (1962-70) and Professor at the University of Toronto (1970-85). He was also a visiting professor at the University of California at Berkeley (1966-67), Hebrew University (1973), University of Pennsylvania (1977) and New York University (1985). When he reached the University of Toronto’s mandatory retirement age in 1985, he did exactly what his friends knew he would do: he continued in active research as Professor Emeritus, publishing and representing the consumer interest in public utility regulation for the next twenty years.

Mike’s research contributions were extensive. He was the author of several books, including The Investment, Financing and Valuation of a Corporation; Accounting: A Management Approach; and The Cost of Capital to a Public Utility. The breadth of his research was extraordinary, publishing well over 100 articles in almost every area of finance and also publishing extensively in accounting and economics. He served as President of the American Finance Association (1975-76) and was an Associate Editor of Journal of Finance, Financial Management, Journal of Banking and Finance, and Journal of Economics and Business. He also served on numerous committees of the American Finance Association, the American Accounting Association, and the Institute of Management Sciences. Mike was a wonderful colleague and co-author. As his University of Toronto colleague Paul Halpern recalled, “He had a remarkable intuition that inevitably led to insights, always shared in a non-confrontational and effective manner, both in co-authored papers and in research being presented by colleagues and visiting academics.”

He received many significant honors for his work including: Fellow, Royal Society of Canada (1993); Honorary Doctor of Laws, McMaster University (1993); and Honorary Doctorate, University of Toronto (2005). But, perhaps, the most important to him was the conference “Imperfections in Financial Markets and their Impact on Corporate Financial Decisions,” held in Minaki, Ontario in 1989 in honor of his retirement. Mike always loved working with his students and cared greatly for them. On this occasion his former doctoral students as well friends and colleagues came from all over North America to present papers in his honor. While most of the participants used their free time to enjoy the scenic beauty of Lake of the Woods, Mike could usually be found helping his former students by suggesting ideas on how to extend their research. Bob Whaley wrote "Mike was my mentor and instilled in me passion for research. From the day I entered graduate school at the University of Toronto until the day I left, we had countless conversations. His enthusiasm for research was both boundless and contagious. Mike was more passionate about his profession than any person that I have ever known."
He will be greatly missed by all of us.

Information for this obituary was provided by Larry Gould on August 10, 2010.

J. Fred Weston (1916-2009)

In Memoriam

 
J. Fred Weston                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
One of the great early leaders in the fields of finance and industrial economics, J. Fred Weston, passed away in August of 2009 at the age of 93. He often said that “I have always considered the success of my students as my greatest achievement.” He chaired or served on 66 doctoral committees. Those students have published over 220 papers in the top academic journals. They are “Fred’s folks”. Among them are Jerry Baesel, Larry Dann, Harry DeAngelo, Chi-Cheng Hsia, Clem Krouse, Wayne Lee, S. Mansingha, Tim Opler, Ed Rice, Rick Smith, and Mark Rubinstein. Nobel Laureate Bill Sharpe wrote of Fred, “I believe that I can claim to be the first doctoral student to have taken a field in Finance. You, of course, were directly responsible for this, so to the extent that I became a financial economist, one might well date it from that moment. Then again, one might well date it from the day when I became your research assistant.” (William F. Sharpe, October 22, 1990). Nobel Laureate Harry Markowitz (November 19, 1990), wrote “Bill Sharpe and I recall that (a) you published Markowitz 1952, and (b) you suggested that Bill drop in on me at RAND concerning a possible dissertation topic. I am sure that he joins me in thanking you for your support and encouragement long before Stockholm heard of us.”

Fred earned his BA in political science in 1937, his MBA in 1943, and his Ph.D. in financial economics in 1948 – all from The University of Chicago. From 1947-1949 he was an instructor then an assistant professor at Chicago. He then went to UCLA as an associate professor, and was promoted to full professor in 1956. Throughout his career, he published over 100 refereed articles spanning five decades of research. He also published over 30 books. His publishers estimate that over a million people have read them. Managerial Finance, first published in 1962, had 9 editions. Essentials of Managerial Finance, was first published in 1965 and by 2001 was in its eleventh edition. Financial Theory and Corporate Policy has been continuously in print since 1979. His research-oriented books reflect his strong interest in industrial organization, especially mergers and acquisition. A partial list includes: Economics of Competitive Bidding on New Issues of Corporate Securities (1942), The Role of Mergers in the Growth of Large Firms (1953), The Scope and Methodology of Finance (1966), Public Policy Toward Mergers (1969), The Impact of Large Firms on the U.S. Economy (1973), Industrial Concentration: The New Learning (1974), Economics of the Pharmaceutical Industry (1982), and The Art of M&A Financing and Refinancing (1999). His influential papers on industrial organization included: “Diversification and Merger Trends,” Business Economics (1970), “Tests of the Efficiency Performance of Conglomerate Firms,” Journal of Finance (1971), and “Conglomerate Performance Using the Capital Asset Pricing Model,” The Review of Economics and Statistics, (1972). Weston’ honors were many.

He was President of the Western Finance Association 1962, President of the American Finance Association 1966, President of the Financial Management Association 1979, 1980, Fellow of the American Finance Association and of the Financial Management Association, Fellow of the National Association of Business Economists, 1978 UCLA campus wide teaching award for excellence with doctoral students,1994 Anderson Graduate School of Management Dean’s Special Award for, Outstanding Achievement in Instruction. He was awarded Abramson Scroll Award for the best article in Business Economics: In 1989 for “Strategy in Business Economics”, in 1990, in 1991 for “Some Financial Perspectives on the Comparative Costs of Capital”, in 1992 and 1994, and in 1998 for "Restructuring and Its Implications for Business Economics" Fred had a lasting impact on all of those who came to know him well. He set a standard for hard work and for excellence that we seek to emulate, but most of all he was a humble man who helped everyone he touched.

Information for this obituary was provided by Tom Copeland on October 5, 2009.

M. Chapman Findlay (1945-2008)

In Memoriam


M. Chapman Findlay

M. Chapman "Chap" Findlay died June 17, 2008 at his home in Los Angeles. He was 63 and died of cancer, which had been diagnosed a few months earlier.

Chap Findlay was born on July 16, 1944 in Grand Rapids, Michigan. When Findlay was a young child, his family left Michigan for San Antonio, Texas. Chap earned a bachelors degree, a masters degree, and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. During the course of his academic career, Chap served as a faculty member at the University of Houston (1968 - 1971), the University of Connecticut (1971 - 1972), McGill University (1972 - 1974), and the University of Southern California (1974 - 1982), where he also served terms as chair of the department and as executive director of the Center for the Study of Financial Institutions.

Chap Findlay was a prolific scholar with roughly 100 articles and books on financial management and analysis, financial theory, investment and capital markets, real estate and mortgage markets, insurance and pension issues, accounting issues, and legal issues. Perhaps the most significant of his early academic work was with Stephen D. Messner on measures of return for real estate investments. The 1970s were relatively early days for computer applications involving finance problems, and Findlay and Messner developed a methodology that they termed the Financial Management Rate of Return (FMRR). The contribution enabled estate investors to more accurately assess the returns on their investments and thus make better investment decisions. Early work in this area was published in "Real Estate Investment Analysis: IRR Versus FMRR", Real Estate Appraiser 41, July/August 1975. FMRR soon became, and remains, an industry standard. Chap Findlay's most recent book, Models for Investors in Real World Markets, was co-authored with Ed Williams and James R. Thompson, and was published in 2003 by Wiley-Interscience Series in Probability & Statistics. The text has become a leading reference in the field.

In addition to his noteworthy academic career, Chap Findlay had an exceptional career outside of academics. He widely recognized as an outstanding expert witness and provided testimony in nearly 1,000 court cases. He also was co-inventor on a dozen patents. In 1985, Findlay left USC to form Findlay Phillips & Associates, now Phillips Fractor Gorman in Pasadena. During its first 10 years, Findlay Phillips & Associates operated from a suite in California Plaza. While there, Findlay became a co-founding and lifetime member of the City Club. He said it was the only way he could get a good hamburger for lunch without a wait. In his new role outside of academics, Findlay became a preeminent economic, finance, and valuation expert witness in some of the country's top legal cases. In addition, Chap served as a consultant on numerous special projects related to appropriate government regulation. As a consultant to the City of Los Angeles, Findlay undertook a Los Angeles Housing Market Study in which he analyzed the impact of Los Angeles's rent control ordinance. He was a consultant to the State Public Utilities Commission regarding the appropriate minimum amount of insurance to be held by commercial truckers. In addition, he was part of a team that analyzed the economic impact of landfills on nearby residential property values which became the primary research study in that area.

In the 1980s and 1990s, Findlay was one of a handful of experts involved in the defense in open market securities class action cases. He served as a financial expert in the Orange County Bankruptcy case. He was also part of a team that analyzed the financial implications of how "market share liability" was used to allocate settlements in asbestos litigation. In addition, Chap was one of the first experts to testify in the area of alter ego and developed a variety of techniques to "pierce the corporate veil."

In 1998, Findlay was co-founder of Pasadena's "Center for Computationally Advanced Statistical Techniques" (c4cast.com, Inc.), which has developed numerous Internet-based investment and forecasting tools, some of which are marketed under the EconomicInvestor and "The Economy Matters" brands. He served as chief financial officer and a director of c4cast.com until his death.

Despite the shift to practitioner, Chap was never able to completely walk away from his academic roots. In particular, Findlay became an advisor to the Department of Finance, Real Estate & Insurance at California State University, Northridge. And in this role he filled for over 20 years, Chap served as a mentor for faculty, assisted with curriculum development, and facilitated faculty research.

Chap Findlay is survived by his wife Beatrice, a prominent painter with studios in New York and Los Angeles. The family requests that donations be made to these memorial projects. Checks should be made payable to the CSUN Foundation with "Chap Findlay" in the memo field and should be sent to Dean's Office, College of Business, CSUN, 18111 Nordhoff St., Northridge, CA 91330. In addition, the College of Business at California State University, Northridge is creating the M. Chapman Findlay Scholar Fund, which will award a cash prize annually to an outstanding CSUN real estate/finance graduate. The school is also developing an annual Findlay Memorial Lecture, where a pre-eminent scholar will be invited to speak at CSUN on a topic related to Findlay's extensive research.

Information for this obituary was provided by Phillips Fractor & Gorman.

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